Regulation



The Genève Invest Group is composed of the corporate parent Genève Invest S.à.r.l. based in Geneva, Switzerland and its subsidiary Genève Invest (Europe) S.A. based in Luxembourg.

Genève Invest S.à.r.l. is a member of the Self-Regulating Organization Polyreg which is recognized by the Swiss financial supervision organization (FINMA). Polyreg supervises Genève Invest S.à.r.l. with respect to Article 24 of the Money Laundering Act. Genève Invest S.à.r.l. is entitled to operate as a financial intermediary within the meaning of Article 2 (3) of the Money Laundering Act. Genève Invest S.à.r.l., as a wealth management firm, voluntarily submitted to professional and deontological standards of “Polyasset” and therefore will be annually supervised by a recognized accountancy firm.

Genève Invest (Europe) S.A. deals with our clients living in the European Union. Genève Invest (Europe) S.A. is an authorized asset management company recognized by the “Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier” (CSSF). Moreover, our subsidiary is liable to the control of the CSSF (Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier) in Luxembourg, which as well regulates Genève Invest (Europe) S.A.. Genève Invest (Europe) S.A. is permitted to offer the services of an asset management company in 27 countries of the European Union. In addition, it is registered as an asset management firm with the financial regulatory authority FCA (Financial Conduct Authority) in the United Kingdom as well as with the Irish financial services regulator Central Bank and Financial Services Authority of Ireland.

Membership in association for asset managers – Genève Invest (Europe) S.A.

The “Association Luxembourgeoise des Professionnels du Patrimoine“ (ALPP) is a non-profit organisation. It includes over 100 independent companies, established in Luxembourg, whose interaction with each other covers the entire range of financial and asset management services for an international clientele of companies and private individuals.

Seal of approval – “AGDL” – Genève Invest (Europe) S.A.

Genève Invest (Europe) S.A., as a wealth management firm, voluntarily submitted to the professional standards of “Association pour la Garantie des Dépôts Luxembourg” (AGDL) to set up a mutual guarantee system for cash deposits resulting from investment transactions.

Insights


Archived News
An insight to the seniority of corporate bond issues

An insight to the seniority of corporate bond issues

Holding a corporate bond is a bit like holding an IOU (“I owe you” – it signifies an outstanding debt) from a trusted friend. At the time the money is handed over it seems inconceivable that anything could go wrong. However, if you have enough IOUs with enough friends, eventually one of them will struggle to repay their debt. It may only happen once every hundred IOUs you hold but when it does occur, where do you stand? In the line of people who are owed money, are you are the start of the line, or all the way at the back?

An insight into the maturity and duration of bonds

An insight into the maturity and duration of bonds

A bond is a security which can be purchased by private as well as institutional investors. A certain term (maturity term) is set and the bond has to be repaid once the bond matures. Interests are usually paid at regular intervals (quarterly, semi-annually or annually) during its maturity term. The extent of these interest payments are generally specified in advance, which is why bonds are also referred to as Fixed Income securities.

Report from Genève Invest on the Swiss economy and the removal of the EUR/CHF exchange rate floor

Report from Genève Invest on the Swiss economy and the removal of the EUR/CHF exchange rate floor

Amongst the most prestigious asset management companies in Europe, Genève Invest has released a financial and economic analysis which seeks to draw conclusions from 2015, the year that will probably go down in Swiss history as some kind of “year zero”. The decision to remove the exchange rate floor between the Euro and Swiss franc made by the Swiss National Bank in January 2015 put literally all of Switzerland’s crucial export sectors under enormous pressure.

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